Robertson County offers a rural, small-town lifestyle in close proximity to the amenities available in a world-class city like Nashville. We offer almost any lifestyle — rural home sites, historic districts, golf course communities, and even loft living on our revitalized downtown square in the heart of Springfield. Come for a visit and you will see that we are minutes from Nashville, miles from ordinary.

About Robertson County

POPULATION

CHARMING TOWNS

MINUTES TO NASHVILLE

SQUARE MILES

Living In Robertson County

Robertson County has long been home to generations of tobacco farmers and cattle ranchers. In recent years, the county has seen more and more young families, small business owners, creatives, and retirees relocate to the area. As word of the quality of life, reasonable cost of living, and close knit communities offered in Robertson County spreads throughout the region, many who seek a small town life within 30 minutes of the city have chosen to head just north of Nashville, joining the vibrant communities of RobCo.

Retire Tennessee

Robertson County offers a rural, small-town lifestyle in close proximity to the amenities available in a world-class city like Nashville. We offer almost any lifestyle — rural home sites, historic districts, golf course communities, and even loft living on our revitalized downtown square in the heart of Springfield. It is quickly becoming one of the best spots to retire in Middle Tennessee.

History of Robertson County

The first settlement in Robertson County was established by Thomas Kilgore, who came there in 1778 claiming land and building a station in 1779 near present-day Cross Plains. Prior to statehood this area was one of the counties in Mero District and called Tennessee County, located north of Nashville on the Kentucky border.

One of the first acts of the new state was to appropriate Tennessee County’s name for its own use and to divide that county into Robertson and Montgomery Counties. Robertson County took its name from General James Robertson, often called the “Father of Middle Tennessee.” Robertson County, established by the general assembly on April 9, 1796, covered 477 square miles and contained 304,640 acres.*

*Author: Yolanda Reid | Tennessee Encyclopedia

Robertson County History Museum

Visit the Robertson County History Museum

HOURS:
Wednesday – Friday: 10am- 4pm
Saturday: 10am- 2pm

The Robertson County Historical Society, organized in 1968 and incorporated from the State of Tennessee on May 1, 1969, has as its chief project the operation of the Robertson County History Museum, located in the former county Post Office building.

The exterior of the building was designed in the Academic Roman Revival style, with arched windows insuring plenty of light inside the building. Two of the original windows for purchasing stamps have been returned to their former location within the building. Two cases that once housed “Wanted” posters now contain photographs of the building under construction from May of 1913 until January of 1915. The lobby area terrazzo floor is designed with three separate sections bordered with rose-hued Tennessee marble. The ceiling of the lobby is exactly the same as when the Post Office was originally built. 

In the center of the museum are displays highlighting the two facets of agriculture and industry which fueled Robertson County’s economy for much of the past two centuries. Tobacco has been an integral part of the economy of the county since the early 1800s. From the end of the Civil War until Prohibition, distilleries operated throughout the county.

“White House, TN has offered my small family and I the opportunity to live and grow in a small town rich in genuine southern hospitality and family-friendly events. On any given day, I can take my son on a walk along the serene paths of the local Greenway trail, browse the endless stalls of the indoor flea market for hidden treasures, or sip on a warm and decadent vanilla latte while sitting by the fire at the quaint cottage-styled coffee house down the road in Millersville. When scouting the surrounding Nashville neighborhoods for an excellent day trip or looking for a new place to call home, the residents of White House, TN will extend a warm and friendly invitation to come see for yourself why we love it so much here!”

Getting Here

Seated between highways 24 and 65 on the east and west and Clarksville and Nashville to the north and south, Robertson county spans 476 square miles of rolling hills, quaint towns, and hundred year old tobacco barns. Start your visit at the county Chamber of Commerce, where you can grab brochures and maps for some of the county’s most popular spots. Enjoy lunch and shopping on the square, and set out for your Robertson County adventure!

“I love this wonderful town and community! I’m not from here, but everyone here has become like my family. We all look after and support one another.”

Victoria B – Robertson County Resident

Civil War Trails

Civil War Trails connects visitors with the great campaigns and lesser-known sites of the Civil War. Our signature signs and distinctive red bugle guide visitors as they follow in the footsteps of the generals, soldiers, citizens, and the enslaved who found themselves in the midst of this great struggle.

In the Press:

Tennessee Crossroads

Ken Wilshire tours the Springfield town square to explore how food can bring parts of a community back to life.

Ring of Fire Trail

Go off the beaten path to discover some of Middle Tennessee’s most unique experiences and rich history — from settlers and Civil War soldiers to the Bell Witch and underwater ghost towns.

The Ring of Fire Trail features several Robertson County stops including The Robertson County Chamber of Commerce, Thomas Drugs, and Sumner Crest Winery. Enjoy exploring fascinating stops and scenic routes across the entire state!

Photography + Videography Partners

The Robertson County artists below provided the photography and videography for ExperienceRobertson.com. We selected each of these professionals for their love of Robertson County and ability to capture life here so artfully. We are endlessly grateful for their talent and support!

 

                          Shelby Andal Photography                                                     Kathy Neal Photography                                                             Joey Sircy Photography

                    Joey Sircy Photography

                             Stratton DV Imaging                                                            Meagan Woodis Photography                                        Kelly Young | The Ginger Experience

 

          Meagan Woodis Photography       Kelly Young